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Inspirations
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Summer 2004

I've got a domain! For excerpts from all my books, news, and author information, visit me at:

Donna Conger, Romance Author

Preditors and Editors

Are you an aspiring writer?
Check out my 2 newest workshops,
What I Wish I Knew When I Started to Write &
Romance Writing 101
 

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Featured Book and Author:
Marlo Schalesky
Only the Wind Remembers
 
Reviewed by Donna Conger
 
I was waiting to board a plane to a writer's convention, and a lady in the Salt Lake City airport looked at the copy of "Only the Wind Remembers" in my hands. Her eyes lit up and she said, "Oh, I've heard that is so good!" I was only a few pages into it, but I replied, "Yes, it is wonderful!"
 
I meant it. Within a few pages, Ms. Schalesky launches the reader into the life and history of Wanasi, the last of his tribe. I thought it would be a sad story--a forty year old Yahi Indian who literally walks from his world to the world of the white man--and leaves all he knows behind. But "Only the Wind Remembers" is the spine tingling story of one man's crossover into the alien world of the saldu (white man), and into a multi layered mystery that culminates in a multi layered surprise ending.
 
Based on historical facts in the year 1911, Wanasi, known only as Ishi (man), faces a new world composed of saldu who speak an alien tongue, offer him sweet, round pieces of bread with a hole in the middle called doe-nuh, and beans that taste like honey mixed with fire. Ms. Schalesky does an incredible job of showing us the white man's world through an Indian's eyes, down to the strange contraptions called shoes. Wanasi's decision to leave his safe world makes him a curious sideshow to the saldu men, women, and children gazing at him through jail bars. To Thomas Morgan, anthropologist, however, he is a miracle. The young scientist rescues the Indian from the prying eyes of the citizens of San Francisco, and makes an instant friend.
 
Thomas quickly learns that the Indian is a person who feels and who has needs like any other human being. He proceeds with his plans to make a home for Ishi at the museum. Ishi trusts Thomas Morgan. The saldu has given him the warm hand of friendship, a soft bed, and food. All is right with Ishi and Thomas, but not with Thomas's wife, Allison.
 
The young anthropologist does not know that his agenda with his miracle is interfering with the private, complicated world of his wife. The real miracle begins when Ishi, Thomas, and Allison's lives come together. A triangle of bonds are formed, and at the point, as it should be, God above it all. In a matter of weeks, earth shattering secrets are revealed and hearts healed--because one Indian stepped off the edge of his world into another, a strange, scary place where God had plans for him. "Only the Wind Remembers" is a beautiful love story--romantic love, apape love, and the mind boggling God-love our Heavenly Father has for us, so much that He will work in very strange ways that we might have life, and have it more abundantly.

 

Available in bookstores nationwide and through Christianbook.com

Moody Publishers

ISBN: 080243324-3

$12.99

371 pages

 

 
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Detective Mystery Stories is a magazine that features Murder She Wrote and Diagnosis Murder type mysteries, not the HBO type with sex and vulgar language. Please visit their site at:

Detective Mystery Stories

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My first nonfiction book,
is now ready for release! Only $14.95!
 
 
Don't Call Me African-American rejects politically correct labels as the work of a society who, in its quest not to offend, ends up offending one woman's sensibility about who she is. Join the author as she describes a life riddled with rejection from other blacks for being "too white". Celebrate with her as she learns, over the course of decades, how little her color has to do with becoming a person she likes. Enriched with the wisdom of Whoopi Goldberg and Keith Richburg, the author lays bare her feelings about her journey to wholeness. Call her Negro. Call her Black. Better yet, call her a Black American. Just don't call her African-American.

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